Chan Practices

What is Chan

Chan exists universally and eternally. There is no need for any teacher to transmit it; what is transmitted is just the method by which one can personally experience Chan. In China, the Chan school developed from Indian Dhyana Buddhism, which taught methods of meditative concentration aimed at the attainment of an absorbed, concentrated state of mind. This school later spread to other countries from China, and is called Zen in Japan, Son in Korea, and Thien in Vietnam...

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The Principles of Chan

The principle of Chan is taking body and mind from a state of confusion and disparity through a condition of one-mind to the experience of no-mind (or no-thought). This is the result of letting go of one's clinging attachment to the sense of "I," and to the illusion of the permanence of the self and phenomena...

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Methods

Chan is often referred to as the "gateless gate." 
A "gate" is both a method of practice and a path to liberation. The gateway into Chan will open naturally as long as a practitioner can let go of his/her self-centered conscious mind. In response to people's needs, past Chan masters adapted other forms of practice and invented methods that made Chan more accessible...

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Three Stages of Chan Meditation

Stage 1: 
To balance the development of body and mind in order to attain mental and physical health. Various methods of physical exercise for walking, standing, sitting, and reclining are used...

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What is Enlightment

Enlightenment is seeing self-nature. Some called this nature "buddha-nature" or the "nature of emptiness." When one has no attachment to the notion of "self," one's attitude in dealing with any situation is called wisdom...

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Chan Practice in the Daily Life

Practice should not be separated from living, and living at all times should be one's practice. Proper practice includes cultivating mindfulness, compassion, intuition, and wisdom. Think less about oneself and more about others. Be aware of your changing mental and physical conditions...

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The Effects of Chan Meditation

Treasure in Chan Meditation

In modern times, the great strides of science have solved many problems deriving from the natural and social environments, as well as from human physiology and psychology. And yet, with the advancement of material civilization, the problems waiting to be solved have actually increased...

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The Meaning of Life

The Meaning of Life is to Fulfill One's Duties and

Many people ask me, "What is the intrinsic quality of life? What is the meaning of life? Where is the value in life? What is the purpose of life?"...

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Fundamentals of Zuo Chan

Zuo Chan (meditation) was practiced in China long before the appearance of Chan. The earlier masters practiced according to methods in the Hinayana sutras, which emphasized the techniques collectively known as samatha-vipasyana. Generally speaking, these were methods for achieving samadhi through three aspects: regulating one's body, regulating one's breathing, and regulating one's mind...

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Chan Practice and Faith

People interested in Chan practice often find it difficult to have religious faith. As faith is intrinsically emotional, and Chan practitioners emphasize personal cultivation to gain physical and mental benefits or the experience of Chan, they find it hard to accept religious faith. This is actually a great mistake...

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In the Spirit of Chan

Perhaps some of you have heard the saying Chan (Zen) is not established on words and language and Chan is a transmission outside conventional teachings. But if Chan does not rely on words, why would anyone want to read a Chan book? Is not that a contradiction? Although Chan is not established on words, it has, among the many sects of Buddhism in China, left behind the most writing. The primary goal of these writings, however, is to show you or teach you that Chan is not established on words and language and that Chan is a transmission outside the conventional teachings. So there is a reason for you to read such a book...

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How to meditate



Learn the Meditation Basics

Zuo Chan (meditation) was practiced in China long before the appearance of Chan. The earlier masters practiced according to methods in the Hinayana sutras, which emphasized the techniques collectively known as samatha-vipasyana. Generally speaking, these were methods for achieving samadhi through three aspects: regulating one’s body, regulating one’s breathing, and regulating one’s mind.

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Eight-Form Moving Meditation



Watch and Learn

The Dharma Drum’s Eight-Form Moving Meditation was developed by Master Sheng Yen of Dharma Drum Mountain as a means of allowing people living stressful and busy lifestyles to enjoy some of the benefits of Chan meditation. The system, based on many years of practice and personal experience, has incorporated the essence of Chan meditation into a series of simple physical exercises. In addition to physical exercise, practice of the Eight Forms helps you relax your body and mind, so that you can develop a healthy body and a balanced mind.

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